Follow BUSRide on Facebook Follow BUSRide on Twitter Watch BUSRide on YouTube
Follow BUSRide on Facebook Follow BUSRide on Twitter Watch BUSRide on YouTube

StarMetro recycles through the artist’s hands

Scrap bus parts imbued with a love of movement and machines inspired the 11-foot aluminum sculpture by Florida sculptor Mark Dickson that now stands in front of the StarMetro Transit offices in Tallahassee, FL. The sculpture took nearly three months to complete and weighs nearly 700 pounds.

StarMetro used funds available through the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Art Enhancement Program to recycle old bus parts through Dickson’s hands. FTA provides full grant monies to local transit agencies such as StarMetro to incorporate local art in the design of their transit facilities.

Dickson says his creation represents the power of the wind in a sail, the forward motion of wheels on the road and the feeling of momentum moving us forward. He used discarded bus rims and exterior bus panels to create the work that now stands in front of the offices on Appleyard Drive.

“We are very excited to integrate art from local artists in our transit facilities,” says Ron Garrison, Executive Director of StarMetro. “Good design and art in various forms and media can enhance the appearance of a facility, give vibrancy to a community’s public spaces and make the public feel more welcome.”

Dickson, a member of the Council of Culture and Art (COCA), has studied with respected sculptors and attended Florida State University to study fine art and metal fabrication. He now owns his working studio in Tallahassee.

Florida sculptor Mark Dickson at work on his conversion from scrap to art for StarMetro. He used discarded bus rims and exterior bus panels to represent what he sees as the power of the wind in a sail, the forward motion of wheels on the road and the feeling of momentum moving us forward.

Other notable works by Dickson in the Tallahassee area include a sculpture in The 621 Gallery’s Charles Hook Sculpture Garden in Railroad Square. He also had a hand in installing Hugh Nicolson’s ‘Storm Song’ sculpture — the iconic dolphin sculpture on the back steps of the capitol building.

“It is an exciting and progressive step for our local public transportation to include the arts as it moves into a bright future,” says Dickson. “Tallahassee will continue as a cultural attraction with the advancement of public art.”

Share
Posted by on Sep 1 2010. Filed under Enthusiasts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

©2013 BUSRide Magazine. All Rights Reserved. Content on this website is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in while or in part without the express written consent of the publisher.

© 2010-2014 BUSRide Magazine All Rights Reserved. Content on this web site is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher.